March 4, 2013
by admin
8 Comments

A SUPERBETTER Site Update

Dear SuperBetter Players,

You may have seen a few more bugs and errors lately across SuperBetter and are thinking “What is going on?!” We empathize with you and want to let all our awesome players and fans know what is going on. We are currently looking to transition SuperBetter to a new home, where players can continue on their path to getting SUPERBETTER. We are in talks with a few different allies and hope to have good news to share in the coming weeks. But in the meantime, we expect some bumps and possible disruption along the way.

For now, the site in its current form will stay up through the end of March. If you’re currently playing your way through a Power Pack, or on your way to an epic win, keep going! There’s still a ton of resilience you can build between now and March 31.

Because there maybe a disruption in the site (and app) availability after March 31, you may want to take some screenshots of your secret headquarters now, or make a list of your favorite power-ups and bad guys, so you continue to have resources for your SuperBetter journey.

And in the meantime, thanks for your patience with the bugs — and look for some updates soon.

- The SuperBetter Labs Team

November 9, 2012
by bez
34 Comments

Why I Love Working at SuperBetter: the Resilience of Silliness

What did your last remote meeting look like? 

Here’s ours—and it’s just one of the many reasons why I love working at SuperBetter.

 

At SuperBetter, Resilience, play, and gamefulness aren’t just concepts that we promote. They’re truths that we live—as a business and as individuals. When communication turns strained, when the future looks dark and unknown, or when we’ve got to push through a crunch-time challenge, we return to the basics of Resilience.

  • We spread Social Resilience by giving hugs and sharing our gratitude for what each one of us does each day—and by awarding each other Achievements in the game. We know that a dose of silliness can do wonders for social connection and creativity.
  • We tend to Emotional Resilience by expressing our needs, excitements, and concerns openly. We shift out of negative thinking and into positive thinking using Power-ups, gratitude, and realistic optimism. We laugh. We don’t take ourselves too seriously.
  • We activate Mental Resilience by practicing mindfulness, staying curious, and making our current challenge as fun as possible—how can we turn this rough patch into an exciting challenge? How can we stay present with what’s happening rather than jumping to conclusions?
  • And we strengthen our Physical Resilience up by sharing healthy meals, challenging each other to Power-ups and Quests, and going on fun adventures together.

We do these things because Resilience isn’t something that we either have or we don’t—it’s a practice. It’s made up of the little things we do each day that make us laugh, foster a sense of connection, activate positivity, and get our hearts going. Those little things add up to greater health, pleasure, strength and flexibility—which sounds pretty good to us.

What one little thing you do that makes you smile, laugh, feel good, or feel strong? Post it in the comments below—then make it a Power-up in the game!

 

October 3, 2012
by bez
6 Comments

A Scavenger Hunt—SuperBetter Style

Heroes—prepare for the hunt!

This year a component of the Compassion Games: Survival of the Kindest challenge is a SuperBetter Scavenger Hunt. The Games will use the SuperBetter platform to suggest Quests and Power-ups to those who add superbetter@compassiongames.org as an Ally during this month-long event, running from September 21-October 21, 2012.

Interested? Invite superbetter@compassiongames.org to be an Ally—then await your first mission!

You’ll receive suggestions for Quests and Powers-ups to help you reach your personal Epic Win and also be a part of something larger. The Compassion Games seek to create a culture of compassion, kindness, and justice. Your participation will help them reach their Epic Win. Dare we say it’s a “Win-Win” situation?

Check out the Scavenger Hunt: SuperBetter page for more information, and be sure to explore the rest of the Compassion Games: Survival of the Kindest website to learn more about this awesome event!

July 5, 2012
by Sarah
6 Comments

We made the Top 5 in US Health and Fitness! (Press Release)

We recently put out a press release about our new mobile app. You can see the whole thing here.

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SuperBetter Health Game Now Available in iTunes App Store

Top 5 US Health & Fitness Downloads in First Week

SAN FRANCISCO, Jul 3, 2012 — SuperBetter Labs announced today that SuperBetter, its first social online game, has launched on the iOS mobile platform. The app, now available in the iTunes app store, will be available for free for a short time. During its first week in the iTunes store, SuperBetter made the list of US Top 5 downloads for Health & Fitness apps. Widely recognized for its innovative approach to helping people lead “epic” lives (from general well being to recovery from illness and injury), the game was originally released online in public beta web format in March 2012. Development for the much anticipated mobile app began shortly afterwards due to overwhelming user requests.

“Our greatest challenges and triumphs don’t happen in front of a computer screen. They happen when we are out living in the world,” said General Manager John Solomon, on the launch. “We know that SuperBetter users will find the mobile format more convenient to use as they manage their daily lives, face challenges, track and share their progress and receive expert advice on the spot. We are excited that the public reaction has been so receptive in the first week of launch, and know this means great things for SuperBetter and its players moving forward.”

The mobile version of SuperBetter incorporates the core functionality of the online game, www.superbetter.com , and organizes it into a concise mobile experience designed for the active lives of its users. SuperBetter mobile encourages users to check-in daily for their Quests and new Power-Ups, while fighting their Bad Guys, and checking-in with Allies. The app also allows users to review their SuperBetter activity and achievements and post status updates to their profiles.

SuperBetter is available now for free for a limited time.

ABOUT SUPERBETTER LABS:

SuperBetter Labs’ mission is to design platforms that help people lead “epic lives.” The concept of an epic life is centered on developing strong social relationships, positive emotion, overcoming challenges, and creating a truer sense of purpose in the real world through the use of online game mechanics, gameful IT products and other tested methods of positive social interaction. SuperBetter is the first product of SuperBetter Labs, a social game platform designed to help players build personal resilience and achieve their health and wellness goals. More information on SuperBetter Labs can be found on the SuperBetter Labs web site, Facebook page and Twitter feed.

CONTACT: Cathie Bennett Warner 415-420-1573 cathie@superbetter.com

June 20, 2012
by Jessica
0 comments

Hero Training: Playing to the Goal

In this series of posts, Rowan, aka All-Star Courtney, gives players the inside scoop on embracing the playful nature of SuperBetter. She will discuss topics such as creating your secret identity, how to transform your daily activities into a roleplaying adventure, and crafting the story of your epic journey. Look for the next post in a couple weeks!

Rowan’s Introduction: The Fun of Being a Hero


Hi there, heroes! Hope all of you out there are doing well and owning both your lives: the mild mannered every day you and the hero you. It is that duality that we’re going to talk about today. SuperBetter is a fantastic tool to overcome so many different things. It takes tough issues, both emotional (such as depression or anxiety) and physical (such as getting fit or an ongoing illness) and turns them into a game to win.

So, what is the point of this series? These posts are here to discuss ideas on how to make your SuperBetter experience more game-based and interactive. When someone creates their own world of reality, they have the full ability to grow within it. I started just the way every player starts, with the SuperBetter homepage and login. But I had a few extra tools in my chest. I had a background in Roleplaying, Storytelling and Game Creating. Using these tools, I created a world for my SuperBetter journey from the ground up. And in this blog series, I will share a lot of these tips and techniques with whomever wants it. But first, you have to be willing to play.

As adults we’re told so many times that games are for children. People roll their eyes and talk of people wasting their lives in fantasy worlds that accomplish nothing. Now science has come along and proven that there are real benefits found inside the childhood antics of playing games and playacting. This basic principle of SuperBetter is described in helpguide.org:

“Play is often described as a time when we feel most alive, yet we often take it for granted and may completely forget about it. But play isn’t a luxury – it’s a necessity. Play is as important to our physical and mental health as getting enough sleep, eating well, and exercising. Play teaches us how to manage and transform our ‘negative’ emotions and experiences. It supercharges learning, helps us relieve stress, and connects us to others and the world around us. Play can also make work more productive and pleasurable.”

For me as a hero and All Star, this was so important. I got to do so much more than my mild-mannered teacher self could. By turning this into a game, rather than just a check list of to do’s and to don’ts, I was able to make myself accomplish things I thought impossible. My willpower skyrocketed. You know why? My game persona would have done those things. The gaming aspect allowed me to step away from myself and do things not because I wanted to, but because my hero self would not take no for an answer. She had the willpower, so would I.

Also, I got much more enjoyment from it when I changed it into a game as it became so much more immersive. When I lost a battle, I knew the war still continued, so I could more easily pick myself up and continue. This is a part of transforming our negatives. I could try again and beat that enemy the next day because it was a part of the game, not just something inside me that I could never get away from. So with this transformation, from reality to game, from me to hero, I was able to move into the next benefit of learning from it and relieving stress. And boy, we can all use that.

Now, if you believe me, let’s get ready to create, grow, learn and relax. Next time around we’ll discuss the importance of the secret identity and how to go about creating it.

Courtney Sloan is a gamer, teacher, storyteller, wife, and mom, as well as an author of dark fantasy, horror, and sci-fi. You can find her story ANTIDOTE FOR THE SOUL in the Gothic Blue Book: The Haunted Edition by Burial Day Books. She was also a Spring 2012 SuperBetter All-Star. Catch up with Courtney on her blog or at @writingtiger on Twitter.

June 13, 2012
by Chelsea
9 Comments

Gameful Design

Two years ago I attended a conference on the emerging field of gamification – or adding game elements to services and applications. Just by giving people a bit of reward, you could incentivize any behavior you wanted — navigating to another page, leaving a comment, learning multiplication.

Others celebrated this silver bullet, but I, as a game designer, was worried. The medium I’d dedicated my life to was reduced to basic behavioral response to stimulus, to operant conditioning, to dolphin training. Click. Cookie. Repeat.

These gamification experts extolled all the superficial, short-term psychological hooks from games and none of the meaningful, metaphysical joy and satisfaction produced from playing. They forgot that players are people.

As we designed SuperBetter, we wanted to prove that games are more than just dopamine injections, that players are more than chemical machines.

SuperBetter offers an alternative to gamification. Instead of taking the psychological hooks and operant conditioning from games, we use their deeply satisfying properties – things like agency, emotion, and immediate feedback - to help people do what they really want to do: feel better, reach their goals, connect with others, and live with meaning. We call this a gameful approach to design.

So, what does this look like in practice? Here are a few key differences in how we approach design. Of course, not everyone who calls themselves a gamification company hits all of these points, but too many do.

We can do better.

PURPOSE

GAMIFICATION
Makes you do what companies want you to do

GAMEFUL DESIGN
Helps you do what YOU want to do

THE GAME DESIGN BEHIND THE SCENES
You play games because it’s what you want to do. No one is telling you to play, no one is giving you money to play, no one is holding a gun to your head making you play. You’re intrinsically motivated. Intrinsic motivation means you take pleasure in the activity itself.

If you don’t want to do something, no amount of awards, badges, leaderboards, or points is going to make you do it – not long term, not sustainably.

MOTIVATING USERS

GAMIFICATION
Relies on operant conditioning (reward, punishment)

GAMEFUL DESIGN
Harnesses the good of games (feedback, agency, emotion)

THE GAME DESIGN BEHIND THE SCENES
You don’t actually play games for points or badges– those are just progress indicators that help you contextualize your improvements/skill (which is exciting). People love games because they are in control and can affect the world (this is called agency), because they can make meaningful choices and interesting decisions. They play because games are delightful, challenging, and filled with clear goals. Operant conditioning ignores all of those things, and tries to motivate using our most basic human instincts instead of the complex depth that makes us human.

SEE IT IN SUPERBETTER
SuperBetter’s core elements — quests, power-ups, bad guys, and allies — help people feel more in control of their lives and capable of changing them (this is agency). Instead of setting goals for you, we let you choose goals that challenge you, and we make sure you’re creating a toolbox of ways to spark positive emotions in your life while identifying and gaining control over those things that hold you back.

INTEGRATION

GAMIFICATION
Added to an existing platform, curriculum, or service

GAMEFUL DESIGN
Integrated into design from the ground up

THE GAME DESIGN BEHIND THE SCENES
All games teach. All play and all fun is learning. If the entirety of a system is “Leave Comment, Get Badge” people will learn that very quickly, and once a system is learned, it loses its charm, its fun, its pleasure. Tack on something like badges or leaderboards, and after an initial engagement spike, the system suddenly becomes a transparently irrelevant annoyance – or worse, an unavoidable reason to leave the site/service altogether.

THE REWARDS

GAMIFICATION
Uses extrinsic rewards

GAMEFUL DESIGN
Uses intrinsic rewards

THE GAME DESIGN BEHIND THE SCENES
Rewards only motivate people to get rewards. Here’s a true story about extrinsic rewards: A child with a love for music starts playing the piano. Her mother, wanting to encourage her interest, begins rewarding her every time she plays. When the mother stops rewarding, the child stops playing, her initial curiosity and intrinsic desire to play diminished by the reward system.

Lasting behavior change comes from within. Giving someone cash to do something taints the nature of whatever they do. Even if it’s something they wanted to do, getting a reward for it decreases intrinsic motivation, and actually makes people less likely to perform the behavior without reward. The moment you give someone a reward, you’re decreasing the likelihood of lasting, sustainable change for them.

SEE IT IN SUPERBETTER
Intrinsic reward is a fine line and hugely nuanced. In SuperBetter, when players report actions, we increase their Resilience score. But Resilience isn’t a made up thing – it’s not just magical, virtual “points” – it’s a reflection of a very real, validated principle of psychology. You’re rewarded by seeing your progress in an immediate, tangible way, but not by the points themselves. SuperBetter also lets you track changes to your well-being, so over time seeing the difference is its own reward. Most importantly, players are rewarded because as they do these actions, they really do start to feel better and reach their goals.

BADGES/ACHIEVEMENTS/AWARDS

GAMIFICATION
Limited meaning/social context

GAMEFUL DESIGN
Meaningful/customized awards

THE GAME DESIGN BEHIND THE SCENES
But wait – didn’t I just say rewards can be bad? There’s a difference between celebrating accomplishment (“award”) and incentivizing actions (“reward”). This is about the former!

Getting an award is a great feeling – when you’ve worked for it. When it feels relevant and special to you. When it represents success at something appropriately challenging. There’s nothing wrong about celebrating accomplishment; it feels great to be recognized for what you’ve done, as long as what you’ve done is actually something worthwhile.

If you go to certain sites you’ll find yourself with random badges for seemingly no reason at all, after just clicking through a few pages (and of course, you have to sign up to keep them). Is that satisfying? (No.)

SEE IT IN SUPERBETTER
While we do have a few automatically awarded achievements in SuperBetter, we found the best way to make awards meaningful was to ensure it wasn’t a machine giving them to you. Allies have the option to give achievements to their heroes: to create a title and customize the icon and provide a reason/description for the award. When players get awards from friends, it means something unique to them, their relationship, and their actions. It matters.

SOCIAL CONNECTIONS

GAMIFICATION
Tokenizes social relationships

GAMEFUL DESIGN
Creates & strengthens social relationships

THE GAME DESIGN BEHIND THE SCENES
In many social games and social services, gates are put onto mechanics that force you to be viral and connect with other players before you’re allowed to continue (for example, you need 3 friends to expand your land in FarmVille). This is tokenizing – or only considering how many connections you have, and not the type, depth, duration, or any number of other facets that make each human relationship unique. Almost every social network game is like this. Even Twitter is like this.

Tokenizing is not actually social. For something to be truly social, the experience of playing has to be different depending on who I’m playing with. Mechanically, social means other people impact the game meaningfully; they’re making interesting decisions and expressive choices too, and my game is unique because of their unique contribution to it.

Again, this comes down to remembering that people are people and not numbers in a DAU or CTR graph or mindless click-machines.

SEE IT IN SUPERBETTER
When you invite allies to join you, we ask you to give them a mission – something unique that you need and would be grateful for and something specifically suited to that person’s talents. We also ask that you check in – that is, have a heart to heart or face to face conversation with them – at least once every two weeks. These aren’t just numbers helping you towards some other purpose; the strength of your relationships matters and has a real and measurable effect on your well being. Each friend is a unique ally.

CHALLENGE AND SKILL

GAMIFICATION
Requires little to no skill

GAMEFUL DESIGN
Trains up skills of players’ choosing

THE GAME DESIGN BEHIND THE SCENES
This is closely linked to learning a system – when developing skills is seen as learning and mastery can be either knowledge-based or skill-based. Most services that employ gamification aren’t challenging or fun to do. They require no skill. In the tired example of frequent flyer miles, for instance: is it fun to click on a flight scheduler? It is challenging to pick Virgin over Delta? No, of course not.

And believe it or not, we love a good challenge – 80% of the time we’re playing, we’re failing. And we love it! We like failing, struggling, and utilizing our skills to succeed. We play games because they challenge us. And when they don’t? We just stop caring altogether.

SEE IT IN SUPERBETTER
In SuperBetter, YOU choose how you want to improve, and the whole game is about getting stronger. Power Packs are custom tailored to challenges, and focus on different skills across the board: social, physical, emotional, mental. Not challenging enough? Add another Power Pack. Overwhelmed? Take a break, or just do a single move (3 quests, 1 battle, 3 power-ups) a day.

VIRALITY

GAMIFICATION
Promote sharing indiscriminately, constantly, to everyone

GAMEFUL DESIGN
Promote sharing meaningfully, at major moments, to whom it matters

THE GAME DESIGN BEHIND THE SCENES
Gamers are great at tuning out irrelevant information, and if they’re constantly spammed with the same canned messages, they’re not going to get engaged. Novelty is a huge component of engagement (it’s something new to figure out, to learn, to master) and unique content adds value. As much as you can, let players add their own messages, and prompt virality when it matters: when the player has accomplished something difficult, when they’ve expressed something unique, when they’ve really made a difference. And don’t blast it to everyone if it doesn’t apply to them: send it to the people to whom it matters most.

THE BIG IDEAS

Phew! Long post! Those were just a few examples, but I hope they helped clarify the difference between what most people call gamification and what we consider the “right” way to borrow from games (gameful design). Looking over the list, here are the three key bullets I’d pull out next time you go out and try to design a great experience:

  • Keep it intrinsic
  • Players are people
  • Agency, agency, agency

Now go make it gameful :)

June 6, 2012
by bez
0 comments

All-Star Lukas On Travel and Keeping Up With My Challenge

This is the first in what I hope will be several blog posts about my SuperBetter challenge, to cut sugar out for 30 days (month of March) and then to switch to only having sugar on Sundays for the next two months (at least).

Most of my sugar-free March went really smoothly.  I have gotten a lot of practice at doing my ’30 days without sugar’ exercise so I have developed plenty of coping mechanisms.  This time around I hardly needed them.  I mostly got through with sticking to mealtimes, being vigilant about preparing ahead for meals, and drinking lots of water.  I think that this is because since my last attempt, I have actually reduced the amount of sugar I keep around me significantly.  However, there’s a big glaring spot in my life where sugar is ALWAYS present – at the office.  Our office has a wall-o-snacks for the taking (this is some Silicon Valley thing I have never experienced before).  I’d wager at least 60% of the snacks are high in sugar, another 20% medium sweet and then there’s a handful of savory things like pretzels, cheese sticks, and V8 — that’s my triad of workplace snack right there :)

The snacks aside, no-sugar March was cruising along and then Jenny and I went to Mexico for her spring break.  We went to Tulum, which is down at the bottom of the Carribean side of Mexico, a place of Mayan ruins and lots of snorkeling.  Mexico (the parts I’ve been to anyway) is a great place to avoid sugar because they don’t seem to do much in the way of deserts.  Sure, if I wanted to I could have bought candy at the store before we headed to our out-of-the-way palapa on the beach but since I didn’t, there wasn’t any temptation at all.  When you have a meal there it’s just the meal – no desert is offered.

The first four nights of the trip were excellent and full of rest and adventure in equal amounts.  I think I really pushed my record for how much time I spent reading in various hammocks.  On the fifth night though, I woke up to an unpleasant illness that wiped me out and left me hollow and dehydrated the next day.  Unable to eat (or really want to try eating) any more of the food provided at our resort, I really had no choice but to have a bit of Fanta orange soda so that I’d at least get a little energy.  This was a bit of a bummer to me because not drinking soda is something I’ve really conquered in my life.  I’m not going to be too hard on myself though, I was sick and in a strange land.  If I could have been at home I could have made myself dry toast that wasn’t WonderBread or I could have had some chicken broth for energy instead of a soda.  The next couple of days were a little bit loose with sugar too because I like to be nice to myself when I’m sick so when we went to the Mayan ruins the next day and the parking lot craziness included a Dairy Queen…well, I’m not the kind of person who easily ignores ice cream :)

In the end, I made it to March 29th without having sugar and then when we got home I re-committed to my epic win where I now only have sugar on Sundays.  It’s Wednesday now and I’ve got a Canadian chocolate bar in the cupboard waiting for me on Sunday.

If anyone is interested, here are a couple of my tips for traveling when I’m trying to work on my eating:

  • Bring snacks you like and can eat.  I bring dried fruits, jerky, and if I’m eating sugar I bring Clif bars as a breakfast option in case there’s nothing good where I’m staying.  They are also useful if I’ll be in hotel with a gym so I can eat something right away after working out and avoid impulse purchases of breakfast pastries.
  • Have a reusable water bottle with you. Fill & drink it empty often, especially on the plane. First of all, it keeps you hydrated (and flying is super dry) but also it helps you feel full and less likely to impulse-shop in the airport gift shop or duty free both of which taunt you with massive amounts of chocolate and candy.
  • Buy a salad (or a sandwich if no salads are appealing) in the airport to take on the plane. Most of the airline food will have sugar in it or sugary parts to the snacks included.  It’s incredibly hard to resist eating while bored/full on a plane because it’s already such an altered state and planes don’t really sell salad.

That’s  all for this post, thanks for reading.

 Lukas is one of our Spring 2012 All-Stars.  You can watch Lukas, and the other All-Stars, share his journey through video blogs on our YouTube channel.

June 4, 2012
by Jane
223 Comments

Show Me the Science! Resilience, games, post-traumatic growth, and more

Looking for the research behind SuperBetter Chief Creative Officer Jane McGonigal’s SXSW, Games for Health, Games for Change, or TED Global talks? Good news: You’ve found it!

Haven’t seen any of these talks yet? You can listen to one right now: Download or stream the podcast of Jane’s 2012 SXSW featured talk: A Crash Course in Getting SuperBetter. Or download the slides from Jane’s Games for Health keynote!

Curious for more breakthrough research? Join SuperBetter.com (it’s free) and explore the science in your Secret Lab! Watch videos, listen to mini-podcasts, or read our “level up” research summaries. And whenever you want to investigate further, you can access the original research yourself! We’ve curated more than 100 of our favorite scientific studies for you, on everything from “Lazy Exercise” to “The Science of Mindfulness”.

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(TIP: The studies here are presented in the order they appear in the talks, so you can follow along with the online podcasts, videos or slides!)

WHAT WE REALLY REGRET ON OUR DEATHBEDS

A first-hand account from a hospice worker: “The most frequently expressed deathbed regrets.”

 

WHY WE WON’T REGRET GAMING

 

The Benefits of Playing Videogames With Your Kids

Research from Brigham Young University’s School of Family Life: “Game On: Associations Between Co-Playing Video Games and Adolescent Behavioral and Family Outcomes.”

Social Games are a Powerful Relationship Management Tool

Research from Michigan State University: “The ‘S’ in Social Network Games: Initiating, Maintaining, and Enhancing Relationships.”

Online Games Effectively Treat Clinical Anxiety, Depression, and Stress

Clinical trials and randomized controlled study from East Carolina University’s Psychophysiology Lab and Biofeedback Clinic: “The Efficacy of Prescribed Casual Video Games in Reducing Clinical Depression and Anxiety”; “EEG, HRV, and Psychological Correlates while Playing Casual Video Games”; “The Effectiveness of Casual Video Games in  Improving Mood and Decreasing Stress”

Avatars Change Our Real-Life Behavior

Research from Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab: “Doppelgangers: A New Form of Self”; “The Use of Doppelgangers to Promote Health Behavior Change”;  “The Proteus Effect: Implications of Transformed Digital Self-Representation on Online and Offline Behavior”; “The Proteus Effect: Self-Transformations in Virtual Reality”

Games Increase Creativity in Kids

Findings from the Children and Technology Project at Michigan State University: “Videogame playing tied to creativity” (summary) and full research paper.

Even Violent Games Improve Real-Life Cooperation Skills

Violent Gaming Leads to Cooperation, Not Aggression” (summary) and full research paper (academic log-in required); “Effect of Playing Violent Video Games Cooperatively on Subsequent Cooperative Behavior”

Games Help Us Tackle Tough Challenges With More Determination

Brain Changes in Videogamers”; “A Neurologist Makes the Case for Videogames”;  “The Neural Basis of Videogaming”; “Dopamine Levels May Determine Work Ethic

Games Increase Self-Efficacy

The Hope Lab/Re:Mission Case Study: “Your Brain on Re:Mission”; “A Video Game Improves Behavioral Outcomes in Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer”; “Interactivity and Reward-Related Neural Activity during a Serious Videogame

 

RESILIENCE  AND POST-TRAUMATIC GROWTH

Personal Resilience Can Be Increased

Review of research literature: “Seven Principles of Building Personal Resilience

Post-Traumatic Growth is Possible

An introduction to post-traumatic growth”; “Post-Traumatic Growth in Young Adults”; “Who Am I Now? Helping Trauma Clients Find Meaning, Wisdom, and a Renewed Sense of Self”; “Assessing Strengths, Resilience and Growth: The Guide to Clinical Interventions”; “The Post-Traumatic Growth Inventory: Measuring the Positive Legacy of Trauma”; “Does Self-Reported Growth Reflect Genuine Positive Change?

 

PHYSICAL RESILIENCE

Sitting Still is Dangerous

Data presented at the American Institute for Cancer Research: “The new science of ‘Sitting disease’

Brief Physical Activity Improves Physical Resilience

Review of the scientific literature: “Brief Bouts and Baby Steps for Physical Health

Research from the NIH: “Exercise Dose and Quality of Life”; “Little Exercise, Big Effects”

 

MENTAL RESILIENCE

 

Willpower is Like a Muscle

Published in Current Directions of Psychological Research: “The Strength Model of Self-Control”

Review of the research literature: “The Science of Willpower

Realistic Optimism is a Strength

Published in American Psychologist: “In Search of Realistic Optimism

Published in Personality and Individual Differences:  “Mental Toughness, Optimism, Pessimism, and Coping Among Athletes


EMOTIONAL RESILIENCE

 

Frequent Positive Emotion Improves our Odds of Success

Research from the American Psychological Association: “The Benefits of Frequent Positive Affect: Does Happiness Lead to Success?”

Positive Emotion Increases Creativity, Social Support

Research from the Review of General Psychology: “What Good are Positive Emotions?”

Positive Emotion Boosts Physical Health

Research from the NIH: “Psychological Resilience and Positive Emotion”

Research from the American Psychological Association:  “Does Positive Affect Influence Health?”

Positive Emotion Supports Neural Growth

Research from the American Psychological Association: “Perspectives from Affective Neuroscience”

The Tipping Point for Positive Emotion is 3:1

Research from University of Michigan: “The broaden-and-build theory of Positive Emotion

 

SOCIAL RESILIENCE

 

Social Relationships Make Us Stronger

Published in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior: “Social Relationships and Health: A Flashpoint for Health Policy

Social Relationships Improve our Reaction to Stress

Research from the NIH: “Social Ties and Cardiovascular Function

Touch for 6 Seconds to Boost Oxytocin

Review of the scientific literature: “How to Be Happier: Touch More

Brief Touch Increases Trust Among Strangers

Research published in Evolution and Human Behavior: “Sacrifice Among Strangers is Mediated by Endogenous Oxytocin Release After Physical Contact

 

RESILIENCE BOOSTS LIFE EXPECTANCY BY 10+ YEARS

 

Social Resilience Boosts Longevity

Published in PLOS Medicine: Social Relationships and Mortality Risk: A Meta-Analytic Review

Positive Emotion Boosts Longevity

Research published in Health Psychology: “The Power of Positive Emotions: It’s a Matter of Life or Death

Mental Resilience Boosts Longevity

From the NIH: “Optimism and Physical Health: A Meta-Analytic Review

Published in the Impact Journal on Aging: “Positive Attitudes Toward Life and Emotional Expression as Personality  Phenotypes for Centenarians

Physical Resilience Boosts Longevity

Published in the International Journal of Epidemiology: “Non-vigorous physical activity and all-cause mortality: systematic review and meta-analysis.”